Thursday, September 16, 2010

Kam's Kapsules: Weekly Previews That Make Choosing a Film Fun

Kam's Kapsules:
Weekly Previews That Make Choosing a Film Fun
by Kam Williams
For movies opening September 24, 2010


Buried (R for profanity and violence) Claustrophobic thriller, set in Iraq, about a private contractor (Ryan Reynolds) who finds himself in a desperate race against time upon awakening in a coffin after being attacked by insurgents. With Robert Paterson, Jose Luis Garcia Perez and Samantha Mathis.

Legends of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole (PG for scary action sequences) Animated adventure about an intrepid barn owl (Jim Sturgess) who leads an escape of kidnapped owlets from an orphanage where they were being brainwashed to join an army led by their evil captors. Voice cast includes Helen Mirren, Geoffrey Rush, Sam Neill, Hugo Weaving and Abbie Cornish.

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (PG-13 for brief profanity and mature themes) Oliver Stone reunites with Michael Douglas who reprises his Oscar-winning role as Gordon Gekko. Here, the disgraced corporate raider teams with his estranged daughter’s (Carey Milligan) fiancĂ© (Shia LaBeouf) to take revenge on the hedge fund manager (Josh Brolin) responsible for the death of the young man’s mentor (Frank Langella). With Charlie Sheen, Susan Sarandon, Donald Trump and Eli Wallach.

You Again (PG for rude behavior and brief mild epithets) Revenge comedy about a young woman (Kristen Bell) who decides to sabotage her brother’s (James Wolk) impending wedding after she realizes he’s about to marry the girl (Odette Yustman) who bullied her back in high school. With Betty White, Sigourney Weaver, Jamie Lee Curtis and Cloris Leachman.


100 Voices: A Journey Home (Unrated) Historical documentary examining Jewish culture from the perspective of a group of cantors who ventured to Warsaw, Poland, the birthplace of Cantorial music.

Enter the Void (Unrated) Surreal melodrama, set in Tokyo, about a substance-abusing American teenager (Nathaniel Brown) whose ghost looks out for his stripper little sister (Paz de la Huerta) after he’s shot to death by the Tokyo police during a drug bust. With Cyril Roy, Olly Alexander and Masato Tanno. (In English and Japanese with subtitles)

Friction (Unrated) Iconoclastic mockumentary, skirting the line between reality and fiction, and revolving around a romantic triangle in which a teenage student (August Thompson) attempts to seduce the emotionally-estranged wife (Amy Mathison) of a teacher (Jeremy Mathison) at an art school summer camp in New Hampshire.

Howl (Unrated) Historical docudrama revisiting Beat Generation icon Allan Ginsberg’s (James Franco) obscenity trial in the wake of his publication of his epic poem “Howl.” With Todd Rotondi as Jack Kerouac and Andrew Rogers as Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Support cast includes Jeff Daniels, Mary-Louise Parker, David Strathairn, Treat Williams and Bob Balaban.

A Mother’s Courage: Talking Back to Autism (Unrated) Medical documentary chronicling Margret Dagmar Ericsdottir’s desperate, intercontinental quest to learn all about the condition afflicting her young son from the world’s leading experts. (In English and Icelandic with subtitles)

Tibet in Song (Unrated) Folklore documentary, narrated by Richard Gere, unearthing the last vestiges of a way of life virtually vanishing from Tibet some sixty years after the purge of the country’s indigenous culture by Chinese conquerors. (In Tibetan with subtitles)

Waiting for Superman (PG mature themes, mild epithets and smoking) Oscar-winning filmmaker Davis Guggenheim (for An Inconvenient Truth) directs this documentary exposing the failings of the dropout factories and academic sinkholes comprising America’s public education system. With appearances by Harlem Principal Geoffrey Canada, D.C. Schools Superintendent Michelle Rhee and Teachers’ Union President Randi Weingarten.

You Will Meet a Tall, Dark Stranger (R for profanity) Woody Allen directs this romantic comedy, set in England, revolving around two couples in crisis. An elderly gent (Anthony Hopkins) abandons his wife (Gemma Jones) to chase his lost youth in the arms of a carefree call girl (Lucy Punch), while his daughter (Naomi Watts) develops a crush on her charming, cosmopolitan boss (Antonio Banderas). With Freida Pinto, Josh Brolin and Roger Ashton-Griffiths.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...


Your synopsis of award-winning documentary Tibet in Song actually refers to a different film. Here is more info via

"Tibet in Song is both a celebration of traditional Tibetan folk music and a harrowing journey into the past fifty years of cultural repression inside Chinese controlled Tibet. Director and former Tibetan political prisoner, Ngawang Choephel, weaves a story of beauty, pain, brutality and resilience, introducing Tibet to the world in a way never before seen on film.

The beauty of traditional Tibetan folk music is showcased through a variety of working songs, songs about family and the beauty of the land. These rarely seen performances are deftly juxtaposed against startling footage of the early days of the Chinese invasion and a concise explanation of the factors leading to the Dalai Lama's flight into exile in 1959. Ngawang Choephel sets the stage for a unique exploration of the Chinese impact on Tibetans inside Tibet.

What follows is a heartbreaking tale of cultural exploitation and resistance, which includes Ngawangs' own eventual imprisonment for recording the very songs at the center of the film. Tibet in Song provides raw and uncensored look at Tibet as it stands today, a country plagued by Chinese brutality, yet willing to fight for the existence of its unique cultural heritage."